Baati (Daal Baati) and Choorma – Rajasthani Cuisine

Dal Bati Churma is a very popular Rajasthani dish. The mere mention of the crumbled Baatis with the Panchmela Daal is enough to get the taste glands working overtime. The simple version is with just the Baatis and Daal on top with drizzle Ghee is the more rustic and traditional way to serving this awesome dish. We have dressed it up a bit with a lot of garnishing to give it more texture and flavors. Serve with Panchmela Daal and a side of the Churma and be transported to Rajasthan.

For Baati:

Prep Time: 10 min + 15 min for resting
Cook Time: 25 min
Serves: 3-4 (approx 12-13 pieces)

Ingredients:

Chapati Flour/Atta – 2 cups
Salt – 1/2 tsp
Baking Soda – 1/2 tsp
Carom Seeds (Ajwain) – 1/4 tsp
Oil – 2 tbsp
Green Chillies – to taste, chopped
Ginger & Garlic – 1 tbsp, minced
Yogurt – 1/2 cup
Water – 3 tbsp (approx)
Oil – few drops, for drizzling
Ghee for garnish
Finely chopped Onions for garnish
Finely chopped Cilantro for garnish
Finely chopped Green Chillies for garnish
Julianne Ginger for garnish
Fresh Lime /Lemon Juice for garnish

Method:

1. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F/ approx 180 degrees C.
2. Sift the Flour, Baking Soda and Salt.
3. Add Carom Seeds and mix
4. Add Oil and incorporate into the Flour.
5. Add Green Chillies, Ginger & Garlic, Yogurt and Warm Water to form a stiff dough.
6. Knead for 2-3 minutes.
7. Drizzle a few drops of Oil, rub and cover the dough.
8. Allow the Dough to rest for 15 minutes.
9. Make golf-size round balls and transfer into a baking tray or a pizza stone.
10. Bake for 15 min., turn and bake for another 10 min.
11. Once done keep them warm until ready to use.

For Assembly:
1. Crumble the hot Baati in a bowl.
2. Drizzle some Ghee and lots of Panchmela Dal on it
3. Garnish with Onions, Cilantro, Green Chillies, Ginger and Lime Juice.
4. Enjoy with some Choorma on the side.

For Choorma:

Prep Time: 10 min + 15 min for resting
Cook Time: 25 min
Serves: 4 (approx 4 pieces)

Ingredients:

Chapati Flour / Atta – 1/2 cup
Baking Soda – 1/8 tsp
Oil – 1 tsp
Warm Water – 2 tbsp + 2 tsp
Oil – few drops
Ghee – 2 tbsp, melted
Powdered Sugar – to taste

Method:

1. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F/ approx 180 degrees C.
2. Sift the Flour and Baking Soda.
3. Add Oil and incorporate into the Flour.
4. Add Warm Water to form a stiff dough.
5. Knead for 2-3 minutes.
6. Drizzle a few drops of Oil, rub and cover the dough.
8. Allow the Dough to rest for 15 minutes.
10. Make golf-size round balls and transfer into a baking tray or a pizza stone.
11. Bake for 15 min., turn and bake for another 10 min.
12. Once done, dip into melted Ghee, roll, pull out and keep aside.
13. Allow them to cool a bit, crumble by hand or in a Food Processor.
14. Add additional melted Ghee and mix.
15. Add Powdered Sugar and mix in.
16. Serve with Daal-Baati on the side as an accompaniment.

Recipe for Panchmela Daal:

Panchmela Daal – Rajastani Cuisine

0 thoughts on “Baati (Daal Baati) and Choorma – Rajasthani Cuisine

  1. Authentic or not, I think this recipe is great! I tried it out and my husband loved it. At the end, that’s what matters.

    You gals rock!

  2. HI..can we make batis in one day advance for party..i tried it and it came out very well..very tasty indeed..thanks

    1. Hi Guddee,

      You can, but as we all know, they will taste the best if baked fresh. If you make them the day before, be sure to pull them out of the fridge for several hours so they come to room temperature. If you try to bake them again to warm them, they may dry out. Then, you can make sure that the daal is piping hot to go on top.

  3. baati turned out be best bait i ever had.. even in tajasthan i never had such amazing baati will try more recipes thanks for putting such a beautiful site for foodies who like to cook cheers n keep it up

  4. hello ladies,

    i tried this dish today, and it totally wowed my husband! he is picky about daal, but he loved your panchmela version. the baatis came out a lil softer than what i can see from your video, but it was delicious nontheless, and perfect! your recipes are awesome, and i am a huge fan! keep up the good work ladies. and those who criticize without a grain of true critique are not worth your salt!! 🙂

  5. Hello H n A,
    I do not have a pizza stone nor the pan like container that u showed in the video. Is it ok to use cookie sheet for baking batis?
    thanks

  6. Thanks so much for sharing your recepies

    I am a HUUUGE fan of your recepies and they are so easy to follow. Even If I am not making anything I enjoy just watching the show. Love your hard work

    Also you guys have great chemistry, you should seriously start a TV show.

  7. Hi gals,

    Awesome dish…But I had one problem..when i made the dish it tasted good but baatis were too hard to crumble…Somehow we managed but any suggestions???

  8. Hello Hetal and Anuja,

    I tried this recipe over the weekend and it turned out great 😀 I have tried baati before but it used to be hard to break, this was just perfect. However I had to triple the recipe (since we had a lot of guests). When I tripled the recipe, I also tripled the amount of baking soda, but this made the baatis smell of the soda 🙁 It wasnt too bad, because once I dipped them in ghee and poured daal over it, it was ok, but I know it didnt smell right. Any suggestions on whether to double/triple baking soda when doubling the recipe?

    Thanks 🙂

    1. Hi Purvi,

      Sorry to hear that. We have never actually doubled this recipe but based on your experience, you may want to increase the amount of soda only by 1/2 next time. Thanks for your feedback.

  9. hi this is dixita patel..
    thank u so much u guys.. i really aprishet for u..
    i saw many items larn 4m hear..
    thank u …

      1. yes hetal i m really enjoying u r show..
        u know i m every day new recipi watch & new every day cooking.. really my husband like u r recipis..
        really thanx ..
        dixita..

  10. Ok, here is the thing. I am a Marwari and I can tell you one thing, Skipping Ghee in case of BAATI is CRIME 🙂 Do you UNDERSTAND(cute angry emoticon)

    Thanks a ton for the recipe , it was Awesome.

  11. My hubby is from Jaipur & we always have our share when we visit home. I need to make the bati in the oven this way. I have never tried baking them, but the deep fried version is rich (very rich) but awesome.

    I make the churma, but the deep fried version and would never deviate from it 🙂

  12. hi, u can eat this garlic chuntney….as its just add flavour with daal n taste so spicy n yummy…mostly in rajsthan most people make garlic chutney with this.

    1. While eating, do they mix all the 3 together or just eat dhal baati separate and churma separate? Like 2 separate dishes?
      Thanks

      1. The baatis are broken and the daal is poured over that with the garnishments and the choorma is served to the side. The choorma is had like chutney or pickle – just a little at a time. This is to balance the flavors of the daal-bati.

  13. More important, Baati recipe never include Baking powder. It is quite obvious that this recipe is Rajasthani recipe and frequently made in villages. Do you really believe that village people are using baking powder???? Really funny. You can make Baati breakable and tastier by adding more oil and 2 tbl spoon of semolina.

    1. I agree. Eventhough I love most of your recipes and learn something new every now and then (I cook extensively and am well versed in various cuisines) this recipe was a disappointment. I don’t mind the baking soda use as much because you do want to cut on calories and this is your version of it. But video just seemed rushed and not authentic. And 1/2 tsp baking soda is quite much!! I agree with Ritu that semolina should do the trick. And if we can make cakes filled with ricotta cheese and desserts filled with cream-cheese why skimp on ghee and oil that really makes this recipe what it is? Baati is a very dense bread and really tastes awesome when properly made (i.e with good amount of fat) Sorry girls, did not mean to be rude but this one really not up to the mark:( And yes, making it into 2 separate videos would have worked better (1 for baati, 1 for chourma)

      1. Could you please provide info on how they should actually be made? I am sure there are many ways to make it and the one shown in the video is one of them. Would love to hear different ways of preparing them, especially the authentic way. Thanks

      2. We tried over 10 different recipes and also tried some with suji and some without baking powder – gosh so many different variations and combinations! We picked the one we thought was the best, keeping the authenticity in mind and yet one that has flavor. Having said that – we got every one of those recipes from people with roots from Rajasthan.
        Every state, every region and every family and then every individual has an unique approach, palate and recipe. That is exactly what makes us unique individuals and a very colorful country!

        1. Dear Anuja,

          I appreciate your hard work in finding right recipe. However, authentic Baati has only one recipe, rest are just short cuts. Another thing is, you are using “yogert” for Baati which is also not correct. Interesting thing about Baati is, it is always prepared in advance, and socked in “ghee”. This will develop a taste of pure Baati. I know, this will increase calorie level but no one eats Baati every day. Once in a while are fine with pure food. What say???

          Here are the perfect ingredients for Baati.

          Chapati Flour – 2 cups
          Gram flour- 1 tbsp
          Corse Semolina – 2 tbsp
          Salt – 1/2 tsp
          Ajwain – 1/4 tsp
          Whole Jira – 1/4 tsp
          Oil – 6-7 tbsp (or use Oil 4-5 tbsp & Add 2-3 tbsp heavy cream )
          Water – (few tbsps to make midum-tough dough)

  14. This is completely “wrong” receipe….This will not taste like true Baati. Very disappointing. I wished you could have come up with authentic receipe.

    1. Seriously what is wrong with you people who are expressing their disappointment and claiming/highlighting how this recipe deviates from the your understanding of what is the “Authentic” way of making baatis. Do you even know that the “Authentic” recipes of making indian dishes varies not just from region to region but from house to house. Appreciate how “Authentic” recipes can be brought into the modern and more health conscious households by twisting and embellishing the “Authentic” recipe. If you don’t like the idea of having garlic, ginger, ajwain, and green chillies in your baati just omit it….if you dont like to kneed your baati atta with yoghurt just omit it…if you like to add rava to your baati dough just add it…if you believe the god-created “Authentic” recipe calls for add some besan to the baati flour just add it…please stop commenting on what you believe is the god-sent “Authentic” recipe and instead please comment on the actual recipe…how did it come out…are there any twist or suggestions you can provide, etc. Please just stop commenting on your definition of “Authentic” because if you really believe the diversity in Indian cooking you will know that there is no ONE “Authentic” way of cooking any indian dish. Jesus unbelievable negativity!

      I tried the recipe and it came our great!

      1. Shut up Ritu. Nobody is commenting you. These +/- comments are for Hetal & Anuja. Or you can ask these girls to put heading “Only positive comments are allowed”. If receipe is wrong, definitely will be criticized. And of course, there is “traditional” associated with food.

      2. I agree that authentic recipe is varying from house to house. But indeed should not vary with multiple ingredients that change the originality. Got it???

  15. Good !! But baking soda is not required in baati and also for churma. Churma, however; is not made from baati. It has its own recipe. If one is left with unused baati’s that is one alternative recipe to use leftover baati’s.
    But any way thanks for you attempt to share with so many people.

  16. Hi Hetal n Anuja..

    Very nice recipe.. I also prepare the same way..
    for churma i use jaggery in stead of sugar bcoz jaggery is good for health also and its tests better thn sugar..
    Thank you..

  17. Hey Gals,

    Thanks for posting this video recipe:) I was looking for this recipe since long time. Great job ! And both of you looking beautiful 🙂 Keep going ..

  18. Thank you for this wonderful recipe, i have been waiting for this from months.
    I am gonna try this for sure.

    There is a request also. There is a very famous dish from Bihar called “Litti”. This is made out of “Satthu”. Sattu is another form of channa daal but it is different from besan.

    Please make a video on how to make litti also, i will be very thankful to you.

    1. Hi Divya,
      There are 2 other ways of making them:
      1. You can drop the baatis in boiling water and allow them to cook for 15-20 minutes, take them out and give them a “cooked tandoor look” on the stove-top.
      2. You can make them in a heavy bottomed pan on very low heat, cover and cook them. You will have to keep turning them around so they do not burn.

      We have not tried either of the 2 above methods but both seem reasonable. Let us which you try and how it works out.

  19. I also make green chutney and baigan bharta with dal – baati choorma which goes really well together. we even make stuffed batis with stuffing like potato and paneer 🙂

  20. hello hetal/anuja,
    wow it looks mouthwatering with dal and garnishing.u make things so simple..and with choorma -a happy meal to end with a happy burp..yum…
    we r rajputs and dal batti is staple in our family..its a must once in 15days…we make both the boiled/fried and baked versions…but add little sooji..also my granny use to add little sorghum flour and chanadal flour aswell…
    sanyukta
    http://creativesanyukta.blogspot.com/

  21. This looks great! Love your website.
    Have you tried making it without baking soda? I make it without that and batis still come out very good 🙂

  22. Hey guys,

    Thank you so much for this receipe… Have been waiting for this one from a long time… I m gonna try it today.. Hope it turns out gd…

    Cheers,
    Khushbu

  23. OMG!! finally u do this!! my husband has been craving for daal baati since months, and i dont really refer to any indian cooking blog other than yours so i have been dodging it since you didnt have it up yet.. and you did it at the most perfect time!!! wish i can hug you guys!!!! thank u, thank u, thank u!!!

  24. H and A,

    U guys rock. I always thought this item is very hard to make and here u guys made it look easy
    I will be trying today.God bless you both
    Can you give Falafel recipe?
    Thanks

  25. Hi Hetal and Anuja

    That is a dream come true recipe .. always heard about this dal-baati-churma … never knew this is baati .. now I can make it .. simple recipe … let me try with more ghee .. ha ha .. Thanks …

    1. This is very nice website for cooking Indian Food. I refer this to people who want to cook Indian Food…Seeing this Daal Baati —CERTAINLY NOT FROM RAJASTHAN—I am bit disappointed…I never seen/ eaten a TRADITIONAL Baati wherein people put Garlic -Ginger paste ,Green Chilies and Yogurt…It is a modified Recepe…..Anyway, good efforts…

      1. Seriously what is wrong with you people who are expressing their disappointment and claiming/highlighting how this recipe deviates from the your understanding of what is the “Traditional” way of making baatis. Do you even know that the “Traditional” recipes of making indian dishes varies not just from region to region but from house to house. Appreciate how “Traditional” recipes can be brought into the modern and more health conscious households by twisting and embellishing the “Traditional” recipe. If you don’t like the idea of having garlic, ginger, ajwain, and green chillies in your baati just omit it….if you dont like to kneed your baati atta with yoghurt just omit it…if you like to add rava to your baati dough just add it…if you believe the god-created “Traditional” recipe calls for add some besan to the baati flour just add it…please stop commenting on what you believe is the god-sent “Traditional” recipe and comment on the actual recipe…how did it come out…are there any twist or suggestions you can provide, etc. Please just stop commenting on your definition of “Traditional” because if you really believe the diversity in Indian cooking you will know that there is no ONE “Traditional” way of cooking any indian dish. Jesus unbelievable negativity!

        1. I am Rajsthani,

          I fully support Pradeep. Baati never includes Garlic -Ginger paste, Green Chilies and Yogurt. This is sop strange. From where did you get this receipe?

          1. Hi Manasi,

            We completely understand that this recipe may not be what you are accustomed to, however please understand that every household will have a different method of preparing a common item. An example would be Rajma…the spices used from household to household will be different but it will still be called “Rajma”. We hope you get to try this variation of Baati – you may find that you like the change. 🙂

      2. Hello Pradeep,and Ruchi,
        I am born and brought up in Rajasthan too and I agree that looking at the recipe, the way of making it, and the way of serving it…anybody can say its not something ‘rajasthani’ but i guess modifications from traditional ones should always be welcomed. Also I dont think you have logged in just to see the pretty faces, admit that u r lacking in ur mind for the recipe. I looked here up coz I dont have any baati oven here in US or I cant create a smoke with the cowdung cakes like there…doesnt matter how well they taste…!!!( hope now u got the idea being traditional cant be choice every time… Rt!!) so have got an electric oven recipe here… So lets thank them for the effort and a new aspect of something u r getting.. Pizza stone seems a great idea too!

        @ Ritu: good piece of adivice… But Its always good to know facts before pointing someone:)
        @ Hetal and Anuja,
        I have followed almost every recipe of yours on youtube….nice, innovative and enthusiatic. For Gujarati cuisine, i must thank you beacuse you somewhere have brought a taste somewhere like my Baa in my hands…so thanks a tonne for that. But must say your knowledge in Rajasthani cuisine is lacking a bit. I like the texture of the dough which was made…perfect in hardness!! But the second most important part after the dough making is making those pedas…n ladies it has a different techinque of folding. A good baati never has those fissures and crevises…thats considered a real bad to serve them. So if its about innovation…i loved that but the basics… Sorry to say but lacking 🙁 expectations …yes a lot more from you than this !!
        Love u ladies <3

        1. By the way the taste i was referring too was of the baatis cooked over smoke and over the cow dung cakes ( not the cow dung cake itself :p ;))
          And sorry for the short forms and spellings ..cant help 🙁

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